Hanley

HANLEY AREA 

In 1775, Yates' map records the townships of  'Handley Green and Shelton.' The pottery industry took off with the construction of the Trent and Mersey Canal in 1777, the associated development of Wedgwood's potteries at nearby Etruria, and then the opening of the Caldon Canal. In 1783, local businessmen formed a corporate charter for Hanley, with Shelton it became a market town under an Act of 1813, and by 1830 it was considered one of the largest towns in the area.

Hanley before 1930
Photo: source unknown

BOTTLE OVENS LONG SINCE GONE


Hanley
J & G Meakin Ltd., Eastwood Works from Lichfield Street
The Eastwood Works supported 7 bottle ovens, (3 biscuit, 4 glost)
The Seven Sisters
Source: from their Centenary Booklet   Date: 1951

Hanley
J & G Meakin, Eastwood Works, from the canal
The Seven Sisters (but you can only see 6 in this view)

Hanley
J & G Meakin Eagle Pottery from the air
Source: from their Centenary Booklet   Date: May 1950 

Hanley
George L. Ashworth Bros Ltd
Photo: source unknown  Date: c1950

Hanley
Masons Ironstone
Photo: Terry Woolliscroft Collection   Date: July 1975

Hanley
Broad Street bottle ovens
Photo: source unknown  Date: unknown

Shelton, Hanley
Swinnertons, College Road, opposite St Marks Church
Photo: source unknown   Date: 1950s

Shelton, Hanley
Swinnertons Victoria Pottery, College Road
Photo: source unknown  Date: unknown

Shelton, Hanley
Hanley Park
Brown Westhead and Moor later Cauldon Potteries
Photo: postcard?  Date: unknown

Etruria, Hanley
Wedgwood factory
Photo: source unknown  Date: 1960?

Etruria, Hanley
Wedgwood factory
Photo: source unknown  Date: unknown

Etruria, Hanley
Wedgwood factory
Photo: source unknown  Date: unknown

Etruria, Hanley
Updraught stack type bottle ovens during demolition at the Wedgwood Factory
Photo: Source unknown   Date: Unknown

Etruria, Hanley
Updraught ovens.
Twyfords Earthenware Sanitaryware Etruria Works, Garner Street
Photo: screenshot taken from the Twyford Film  Date: 1929

Etruria, Hanley
Twyfords Sanitaryware
Bottle ovens under construction
Date: February 1921

BOTTLE OVEN HOVEL COLLAPSED - FEBRUARY 2012

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-stoke-staffordshire-17209042
http://www.stokesentinel.co.uk/Bottle-kiln-collapses-raided-metal-thieves/story-15375663-detail/story.html

Hanley
J. K. Weatherby & Sons Ltd., Falcon Pottery, Town Road
Updraught hovel oven with adjacent muffle kiln (top missing)
Photo: Courtesy of Staffordshire Past Track 1976 more here>
The oven collapsed in February 2012

Hanley
J. K. Weatherby & Sons Ltd, Falcon Pottery, Town Road
Photo: Courtesy of Steve Shaw  Date: February 2012, two weeks before the collapse
 @shawsteve5 Artisan potter, painter, musician



Hanley
J. K. Weatherby & Sons Ltd, Falcon Pottery, Town Road
Photo: Courtesy of Steve Shaw  Date: February 2012, two weeks before the collapse
@shawsteve5  Artisan potter, painter, musician

SOME BOTTLE OVENS STILL STANDING

Johnson Bros., Trent Pottery Two flint calcining kilns at the site of Johnson Bros., Trent Pottery sanitaryware factory, Hanley. Between Botteslow Street and Eastwood Road. Now surrounded by a housing estate.

Hanley
Johnson Bros. Trent Pottery
Flint Calcining Kiln. Open doorway for charging the kiln.
Photo: Terry Woolliscroft Collection  Date: July 1975

Hanley
Johnson Bros. Trent Pottery
Three flint calcining kilns with one in the process of demolition
Date: 20 March 1976

Hanley
Johnson Bros. Trent Pottery
Between Botteslow Street and Eastwood Road
From the air. On the left of the kilns is the Caldon Canal
Date approx: 2015

Hanley 
Johnson Bros, Trent Pottery
Flint calcining kilns
Photo: Julian Read Collection  Date: April 2017

Hanley
Johnson Bros. Trent Pottery
Flint calcining kilns
Photo: Courtesy of Philip Shallcross Collection  Date: March 2019


Smithfield Pottery, Warner Street Updraught potter's bottle oven at the former Smithfield Pottery, Warner Street, Hanley. Clearly visible from the Potteries Way ringroad.  Grade II* listed building. Late 19th Century brick, slate roofs, single ridge and two gable ends.
Bottle Ovens Smithfield Pottery Potteries Way Hanley 2015 photo courstesy Potteries Bottle Kilns Facebook page
Hanley
Smithfield Pottery, Warner Street/Potteries Way ringroad.
 Photo: Courtesy of  'Potteries Bottle Kilns' page on Facebook  Date: 2015

Hanley
Smithfield Pottery, Warner Street/Potteries Way ringroad.
Photo: Courtesy of Philip Shallcross Collection  Date: April 2019

Hanley
Robert Sherwin Ltd., brush manufacturer
Smithfield Works
Photo: source unknown  Date: unknown

Hanley
Smithfield Works
Looking up, inside the empty hovel
Photo: Andy Perkin, Potteries Heritage Society Date: June 2019 



Dudsons, Hope Street  Only the hovel only remains - the firing chamber has gone. The hovel now houses a magnificent museum of Dudson (the firm went out of business in 2019)

Hanley
Dudson's, Hope Street
Photo: courtesy Dudson Date: c2010

Hanley
Dudson's, Hope Street
Photo: Terry Woolliscroft Collection  Date: Dec 2018

Hanley
Dudson's Hope Street
Photo by Sid Meir, courtesy Ian Mood Date: 1970



Jesse Shirley's Bone and Flint Mill, Etruria Opened in 1857, Jesse Shirley's bone flint mill is the only remaining operational steam driven potters' mill in the world. It operated until 1972 producing ground bone, flint and Cornish Stone used by the pottery industry. It also produced bone meal used by the agricultural industry to improve soil. Fully restored between 1978 and 1990 the mill is driven by an 1820s Bolton and Watt rotative beam engine. It is one of the oldest still working and may be the oldest still driving machinery for which it was installed. Steam is raised by a hand-stoked Cornish boiler built at nearby Cliffe Vale in 1903. The site’s historical significance was recognised in 1975 when it was designated a Scheduled Ancient Monument with the buildings being Grade 2* listed. The site was officially opened to the public by Fred Dibnah on 6th April, 1991. It continues to be maintained and operated by volunteers.

Hanley
Jesse Shirley's bone and flint mill, Etruria Locks
http://www.etruriamuseum.org.uk/
Photo: courtesy Glyn Baker, Geograph